boy-george-650

The Week Ahead: May 16 to 22

Boy George headlines LOTOS Fest, Arts Garage hosts indie bands for Delray Art Walk, and beachgoers enjoy “apres” cocktail concoctions. Plus, “The Cripple of Inishmaan,” Face to Face, magician Gary Goodman and more in your week ahead.


WEDNESDAY

face-to-face-2016-band-pic

What: Face to Face

Where: Propaganda, 6 South J Street, Lake Worth

When: 8 p.m.

Cost: $30, or $55 for VIP experience

Contact: propagandalw.com

Remaining just on the fringes of the mainstream punk explosion of the 1990s, the members of SoCal’s Face to Face have managed to forge an intermittent 25-year career with little of the drama—and subsequent plummets into artistic mediocrity—that have affected their more heavily bankrolled alt-rock peers. The group’s first four records are indelible documents of emotive punk, a sound edgier than most commercial rock but melodic enough to pacify your parents. Dabbles into a more classic-rock-inspired sound on 2013’s “Three Chords and a Half Truth” have proven to be just that: dabbles. The band’s latest album, 2016’s “Protection,” finds vocalist Trevor Keith and company returning to the vintage, speedy punk harmonics that characterized their best material.

THURSDAY

IMG_2237

What: ONYX Concert and Art Stroll

Where: Arts Garage, 94 N.E. Second Ave., Delray Beach

When: 9 p.m.

Cost: $10 advance, $12 at door

Contact: 561/450-6357, artsgarage.org

ONYX is one of the newest monthly programs initiated by Arts Garage’s recently hired president, Marjorie Waldo, and we’re hoping it’s catching on. Coinciding with Delray’s monthly Art Walk, ONYX features intimate performances by South Florida indie and art-rock bands in its black-box theater. This week it’s The State Of, the piano-and-drum duo led by Steph Taylor and Nabedi Osorio, whose sound suggests a marriage between Radiohead and Sleater-Kinney; and The Zoo Peculiar (pictured), an experimental Miami trio whose theatrical performances and sonically adventurous compositions have been described as “dark carnival disco pop.” In between bands, browse the ONYX Art Stroll, featuring original art and handmade crafts, in Arts Garage’s gallery space.

FRIDAY

boy-george-650

What: LOTOS Music Festival

Where: Mizner Park Amphitheater, 590 Plaza Real, Boca Raton

When: 7 p.m.

Cost: $59.50

Contact: 800/653-8000, lotosmusicfest.com

LOTOS, for those of you not hip to the acronym, stands for Legends Of The Old School, Mizner Park Amphitheater’s annual concert of yesterday’s pop icons. The third time seems to be the charm for this retro fest, which has assembled its best lineup yet, headlined by androgynous Culture Club superstar Boy George, lately a coach on Australia’s “The Voice.” Featured openers include the Romantics (the endlessly touring hitmakers of “What I Like About You”); Jenny Bergren of “The Sign” scribes Ace of Base; Katrina (sans the Waves), Expose, Stevie B. and more.

Laura Turnbull and Elizabeth Dimon in 'The Cripple of Inishmaan' 2017

Laura Turnbull and Elizabeth Dimon in ‘The Cripple of Inishmaan’ 2017

What: Opening night of “The Cripple of Inishmaan”

Where: Palm Beach Dramaworks, 201 Clematis St., West Palm Beach

When: 8 p.m.

Cost: $81 ($66 for future performances)

Contact: 561/514-4042, palmbeachdramaworks.org

The “cripple” of Martin McDonagh’s 1997 hit play is a broken-bodied dreamer named Billy, whose parents drowned shortly after his birth and who hides his rage by staring vacantly at fields of cows in the Irish countryside. But it’s a comedy! The gonzo humor pivots on the real-life visit of documentary filmmaker Robert Flaherty to the island of Inishmaan, in the early ‘30s, for an ethnographic movie about its primitive people, with Billy seeing the director’s appearance as his ticket to Hollywood. Palm Beach Dramaworks’ production runs through June 4.

לעבור-את-הקיר-נועה-קולר

What: Opening day of “The Wedding Plan”

Where: Cinemark Palace 20, 3200 Airport Road, Boca Raton

When: Show times pending

Cost: $9-$12

Contact: 561/395-4695, roadsideattractions.com/filmography/the-wedding-plan

The cocktail-napkin premise of this Israeli import sounds an eye-rolling studio rom-com that might star Anna Kendrick: After 11 years of perpetual singledom, thirty-something Michal decides to force a marriage timeline, arranging an official wedding date for the last night of Hannukah, and giving herself 30 days to find a groom. Working with Orthodox matchmakers (she’ll only consider a Hasidic husband), Michal engages in a series of first dates and chance encounters that transcend clichés, attaining strange and penetrative insights about love and happiness. Anchored by an award-winning, soul-bearing performance by Noa Kolar as Michal, the depth of “The Wedding Plan” far belies its thinly conceived premise, which perhaps shouldn’t be a surprise: Its director, Rama Burshtein, is responsible for the 2013 art-house breakthrough “Fill the Void.” You can also catch this enlightening film at Regal Shadowood and Living Room Theaters in Boca Raton, and Movies of Delray.

FRIDAY TO SUNDAY

apres-at-the-beach-delray-beach-florida

What: Apres at the Beach

Where: Delray Beach (on the actual beach!)

When: Varies per day

Cost: $30-$299 (varies per event)

Contact: apresatthebeach.com

Delray Beach can offer many things, but skiing weather ain’t one of them. What we can offer is our version of Aspen’s Apres Ski Cocktail Classic, Colorado’s premier post-skiing culinary party. Co-sponsored by Delray Beach and Boca Raton magazines, Apres at the Beach features the top-shelf libations and convivial atmosphere of its western parent festival, this time with flip-fops instead of skis. The event features a Grand Tasting event with special guests Anthony Bohlinger (Chef’s Club by Food & Wine), Brent Lamberti (Stoli), Daniel “Gravy” Thomas (Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum) and more. The weekend includes dance parties, pool parties, seminars and beach yoga, culminating with Sunday afternoon’s Great Apres Beach Pub Crawl & Cocktail Competition featuring concoctions from 32 East, Deck 84, Buddha Sky Bar and more.

SATURDAY

1476465070dcd3f20c01069b2dbdcf6c4e84499581

What: Opening day of “Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike”

Where: Delray Beach Playhouse, 950 N.W. Ninth St., Delray Beach

When: 2 and 8 p.m.

Cost: $30

Contact: delraybeachplayhouse.com

Christopher Durang, a maestro of the absurdist comedy, penned this hilarious rejoinder to the sobering family dramas of Anton Chekhov. A pair of growth-stunted middle-aged siblings named after Chekhovian protagonists live in atrophy in their childhood home in Pennsylvania, but things are about to change when their other sibling, a washed-up Hollywood diva, decides to sell the home. A voodoo priestess and a single-celled boy toy named Spike fill out the supporting roles in this Tony winner, which the New York Times called “a sunny play about gloomy people.” Delray Beach Playhouse’s community production runs through June 4.

SUNDAY

gary_goodman-1

What: Gary Goodman’s Family Comedy Magic Show

Where: Boca Black Box, 8221 Glades Road, Suite 10

When: 2 p.m. Cost: $10-$30

Contact: 561/483-9036, bocablackbox.org

Boca-based illusionist Gary Goodman has been making magic happen since the age of 12, when he invited 10 friends into his garage, charged them a dime a head, and performed tricks he learned from magic books. As a professional magician, his illusions have become more baroque, his style more dramatic, his wit quicker and his mind-reading techniques more refined. But his joy for creating wonder in a roomful of strangers remains just as infectious, whether it’s on a cruise ship, corporate retreat or star-studded gala. Goodman’s fast-paced magic hour includes the only Florida “snowfall” you’re ever likely to see.

As the A&E editor of bocamag.com, I offer reviews, previews, interviews, news reports and musings on all things arty and entertainment-y in Palm Beach, Broward and Miami-Dade counties.
malpaso-24-hours-photo-by-robert-torres

The Week Ahead: Jan. 3-9

The Kravis dances dirty, the Morikami welcomes 2017, and Miami Shakespeare visits Venice in Boca. Plus, Dr. Ruth Westheimer, Malpaso Dance Company, Save the Panther 5k run and more in your week ahead.

 

TUESDAY

What: Opening night of “Dirty Dancing—The Classic Story On Stage”

dirtydancing

Where: Kravis Center, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach

When: 8 p.m.

Cost: Starting at $27

Contact: 561/832-5469, kravis.org

When “Dirty Dancing,” a low-budget movie with no bankable stars and a distributor with an unproven track record, premiered in 1987, it generated the sort of lightning in a bottle that handsomely paid studio heads could never predict. The film has become one of the decade’s touchstones, both for its music as well as its images, earning $214 million on its $6 million investment. Rather than leave this fluky success well enough alone, the entertainment industry has only tarnished its memory with inferior spinoffs: a short-lived television series, an uninspired 2004 prequel, even a video game. So the makers of the stage musical “Dirty Dancing” are making a statement with their show’s subtitle: “The Classic Story Live On Stage.” They’ve cast the closest replicas they could find of Jennifer Grey and the late Patrick Swayze to re-recreate the magic of the original film, staging the live dialogue and choreography to the original soundtrack, with its iconic hits by Otis Redding, Solomon Burke, The Drifters, Marvin Gaye, and more. Audiences have had hungry eyes for the show since it premiered in Australia in 2004. Expect the kind of libidinous dance moves you’re just not going to see in “The Sound of Music” or “South Pacific.” The Kravis on Broadway tour runs through Sunday.

 

What: “Mia Madre” screening

Shots from "Mia Madre"

Shots from “Mia Madre”

Where: Aventura Arts & Cultural Center, 3385 N.E. 188th St., Aventura

When: 7 p.m.

Cost: $11

Contact: 954/462-0222, browardcenter.org

This sublime film from Italian director Nanni Moretti is one of the most observant movies I’ve seen about the deleterious ways we deal with negative information. Celebrated actress Margherita Buy plays a testy, exacting director also named Margherita, who is in the process of shooting a film about an organized labor strike by workers who won’t accept the loss of their livelihood. Off the set, Margherita is coping, poorly, with her own setback: Her hospitalized mother, Ada (Giulia Lazzarini), is dying of cancer, though neither Margherita nor her brother Giovanni (Moretti) have the gumption to admit this—to themselves or, more importantly, to their parent. Avoidance and denial, disconnection and projection become Margherita’s emotional crutches as she navigates both her mother’s inexorable decline and her increasingly wayward movie, whose progress is derailed upon the arrival of a short-circuited, confabulating Hollywood actor (John Turturro, adding welcome comic relief). “Mia Madre” is an unsentimental portrait of wounded human behavior—the kind of mirror to the soul that reflects our deepest selves, even when we don’t like what we see.

 

THURSDAY

What: Lunch and Learn: Dr. Ruth Westheimer

drruth-0009

Where: Kravis Center, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach

When: 11:30 a.m.

Cost: $89 (includes lunch by The Breakers)

Contact: 561/832-5469, kravis.org

What better time to have a frank conversation about sex than a Thursday brunch date with one of the world’s foremost authorities on the subject? A German-born, Sorbonne-trained psychologist, Ruth Westheimer’s career as the nation’s premier sex therapist and advocate began with a 15-minute program that aired on a single New York radio station at midnights on Sundays. After two months, the show expanded to an hour and included audience phone calls; “Sexually Speaking” was eventually syndicated, along with her television show of the same name, and Westheimer emerged as a gregarious pop culture icon whose personality has been described as “Henry Kissinger meets Minnie Mouse.” In this illuminating conversation, Steven Caras will discuss Westheimer’s influential career, from escaping the Holocaust at age 10 to being ranked among Playboy’s all-time top 20 most important people in sex.

 

FRIDAY

What: Malpaso Dance Company

malpaso-24-hours-photo-by-robert-torres

Where: Arsht Center, 1300 Biscayne Blvd., Miami

When: 8 p.m.

Cost: $35-$95

Contact: 305/949-6722, arshtcenter.org

Founded in 2012, this youthful contemporary dance company from Havana has seen its profile, and touring regimen, increase in recent years, thanks to thawing U.S.-Cuban relations. This is a gift for modern dance enthusiasts looking for something different—or in the words of the Miami Herald, a “new side of Cuban dance beyond folklore and ballet.” Malpaso, which ironically translates to “misstep,” will showcase its repertory, which includes “24 Hours and a Dog,” choreographed by Malpaso Artistic Director Osnel Delgado; “Under Fire,” a commissioned work by eminent American choreographer Trey McIntyre; and “Despedida,” a Delago-choreographed dance inspired by the poem of the same name by Jorge Luis Borges.

 

FRIDAY TO SUNDAY

What: Shakespeare in the Park: “The Merchant of Venice”

shakespeare

Where: Mizner Park Amphitheater, 590 Plaza Real, Boca Raton

When: 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 6 p.m. Sunday

Cost: Free

Contact: 561/393-7807, myboca.us

Boca will have first dibs at Shakespeare Miami’s annual mainstage production, a week before it tours Miami, Pinecrest and Hollywood. “The Merchant of Venice,” initially conceived as a comedy but now more remembered for its tragic scenes, is one of the Bard’s most controversial works. Dramatizing the events that lead a merchant in 16th-century Venice to default on a significant loan granted by a miserly Jewish moneylender, the play still battles accusations of anti-Semitism for its seeming perpetuation of Jewish stereotypes. The director of this production, Colleen Stovall, doesn’t find the work offensive: Shylock, the moneylender, is an abused victim, after all, and she sees him as a three-dimensional character. Her director’s notes cite this past year’s tumultuous election season, which has seen hate speech become accepted in the highest levels of government, as the perfect context for the play’s powerful examinations of prejudice. Bring a low-profile lawn chair and blanket, and join the conversation.

 

SATURDAY

What: Save the Panther 5k

savethepanther

Where: Palm Beach Zoo, 1301 Summit Blvd., West Palm Beach

When: 7:30 a.m.

Cost: $20-$35

Contact: 561/547-9453, palmbeachzoo.org

Runners can enjoy the picturesque locals and animal-filled pathways of the Palm Beach Zoo at Dreher Park at the first race in the organization’s 2017 Big Cat Race Series. As always, the run supports a vital cause for species propagation, in this case the endangered Florida panther. An estimated 100 to 180 Florida panthers exist in the wild, and net proceeds from this 5k will fund the Zoo’s partnership with Florida Wildlife Corridor, which protects the panther and its dwindling habitat. Runners receive a free T-shirt commemorating the event and free zoo admission for the day, along with half-price admission for up to three guests per runner.

 

SUNDAY

What: Oshogatsu 2017

oshogatsu-slide-13-950x734

Where: Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens, 4000 Morikami Park Road, Delray Beach

When: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Cost: $6-$35

Contact: 561/495-0233, morikami.org

Legend has it that the Japanese zodiac, borrowed from the Chinese, came into being when the Buddha invited all of world’s animals to come to him on New Year’s Day for a special gift. He could’ve learned something from Noah: Only 12 animals showed up, but each of them was granted its own calendar year in a 12-year cycle. In January, the Morikami Museum celebrates the calendar’s transition to the Year of the Rooster with its 39th annual Oshogatsu celebration, which brings a lively, festive atmosphere to traditionally quiet Japanese New Year customs. Enjoy Japanese fortune telling; taiko drumming and open-air koto musical performance (koto is a traditional Japanese stringed instrument); bonsai demonstrations; a Mochi pounding demonstration; hands-on-children’s activities; and more. Libations will be provided by the Sake Station and Kirin Beer Garden, with food available from the museum’s Cornell Café and special vendors.

Jason is a graduate of the University of Central Florida where he studied journalism and creative writing. He is currently the web editor at Boca Raton Magazine.
billyjoel

The Week Ahead: Dec. 20 to Jan. 1

A Jewish singles mixer turns 30, the Piano Man rocks New Year’s Eve, and a free yoga event kicks off 2017. Plus, The Reverend Horton Heat, “The Nutcracker,” “Hidden Figures” and more in the weeks ahead.

 

SATURDAY, DEC. 24

matzoball

What: Matzo Ball

Where: Il Bacio, 29 S.E. Second Ave., Delray Beach

When: 9 p.m. to 2 a.m.

Cost: $30

Contact: matzoball.org

As that scholarly sage of world religion, Kyle Broflovski, once observed, “It’s hard to be a Jew on Christmas.” The “South Park” tyke was, and still is, correct, but the Christmastime social lives of the Chosen People have certainly improved in recent years, thanks in no small part to the popularity of the Matzo Ball. This locally founded and nationally expanded Jewish singles party is celebrating its landmark 30th anniversary this year with an all-night rager in Delray Beach, offering opportunities to mix, mingle, relax and imbibe while poor Santa Claus puts in his most exacting work day of the year.

 

SUNDAY, DEC. 25

hidden-figures

What: Opening day of “Hidden Figures”

Where: Movie theaters nationwide

When: Show times and costs vary

This rousing, fact-based story of transcendence pushes familiar buttons, but they’re all the correct ones. The “hidden figures” in question are three brilliant African-American NASA employees in the early ‘60s: Taraji P. Henson’s math prodigy, Octavia Spencer’s tireless administrator of the space center’s “colored wing,” and Janelle Monae’s gifted engineer. You could say they have the right stuff at the wrong time, suffering the daily indignities of the Jim Crow South while breaking NASA’s glass ceilings, crack by crack, from the shadows. Writer-director Theodore Melfi and co-screenwriter Allison Schroeder deftly balance the hurtling zeitgeist by providing roughly equal shrift to issues of race, gender and the excitement and paranoia of the space race, which culminates in John Glenn’s historic orbit of Earth. “Hidden Figures” is amusing, tear-jerking and even relevant to today’s human-rights struggles—“we all pee the same color,” asserts Kevin Costner’s director of the Space Task Group as he hammers off the “colored women” restroom sign. But the film is best appreciated for its celebration of three ambitious, boundary-breaking role models besting a system that would rather treat them as second-class citizens. Expect this to eventually be shown in schools nationwide, as it should be.

 

WEDNESDAY-FRIDAY, DEC. 28-30

nutcracker

What: “The Nutcracker”

Where: Kravis Center, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach

When: Various show times

Cost: $25-$89

Contact: 561/832-7469, kravis.org

There are plenty of “Nutcrackers” performed during the holiday season, but there’s only one George Balanchine-choreographed “Nutcracker”—and there’s only one company in our region that can match its exacting standards. Miami City Ballet will once again present Balanchine’s iconic take on Tchaikovsky’s timeless ballet, with its dancing snowflakes, sugar plum fairies and heroic toy soldiers, casting a wintry spell over our lukewarm holiday break. As always, the elaborate costumes and majestic set design will be second to none. Bring the kids—or just bring yourself, and imagine you are one.

 

THURSDAY, DEC. 29

reverendhortonheat

What: The Reverend Horton Heat

Where: Respectable Street, 518 Clematis St., West Palm Beach

When: 8 p.m.

Cost: $30

Contact: 561/832-9999, sub-culture.org/respectable-street

Dallas-based barnburners The Reverend Horton Heat—the name given to gravelly vocalist-guitarist Jim Heath as well as his two-man band—is one of the country’s preeminent psychobilly acts, the niche genre that fuses vintage rockabilly melodies with punk and garage-rock thrash. Cheeky, nostalgic and whimsically attired, these road warriors are recognized for their offbeat sense of humor and infectious live shows, which pull generously from their 11 albums. The Reverend is no stranger to Respectable Street and his throng of devoted South Florida congregants, but this tour stop is particularly special because of its spectacular undercard: Punk icon and leftist provocateur Jello Biafra, whose set includes tunes from his eminent band Dead Kennedys; and The Legendary Shack Shakers, a venerable psychobilly cult band from Kentucky.

 

SATURDAY, DEC. 31

What: The Capitol Steps

Where: Maltz Jupiter Theatre, 1001 E. Indiantown Road, Jupiter

When: 5 and 8 p.m.

Cost: $65-$85

Contact: 561/575-2223, jupitertheatre.org

This longtime troupe of political humorists makes its annual New Year’s Eve pilgrimage to Jupiter, playing a pair of early shows that leave half the night open for fireworks, late dinners, or Anderson Cooper. The group’s wide-ranging 2016 album “What to Expect When You’re Electing” satirized the vast spectrum of the strangest electoral season in modern history. But given the transience of our news cycles, The Steps are promising a night of all-new material for the New Year. With Donald Trump’s Twitter account providing new fodder daily, they won’t have to work too hard.

billyjoel

What: Billy Joel

Where: BB&T Center, 1 Panther Parkway, Sunrise

When: 9:30 p.m.

Cost: $49.50 and up

Contact: 954/835-8000, thebbtcenter.com

Another year, another New Year’s Eve residency for the Piano Man in South Florida. And who can blame him? Who wouldn’t want to escape a chilly New York state of mind in December for our temperate paradise of fellow Big Apple exiles? If you caught Joel’s 2015 end-of-year extravaganza at the BB&T, it’s no reason to bail on this show. At 67, Joel continues to, if not innovate, then at least surprise his legion of die-hards: Every set list on his recent jaunt has been markedly different, with covers of rock ‘n’ roll standards joining deep-cut obscurities and a diverse smattering of hits, on shows that often exceed 30 songs.

turnstiles

What: Turnstiles

Where: The Funky Biscuit, 303 S.E. Mizner Blvd., Boca Raton

When: 8 p.m.

Cost: $75 (includes reserved seat, four-course dinner and champagne toast)

Contact: 561/395-2929, funkybiscuit.com

Then again, we can’t all get in to see Billy Joel at the BB&T. Some of us might need to settle for the next-best thing: Turnstiles, South Florida’s acclaimed Piano Man tribute act. Frontman Tony Monaco’s dedicated band doesn’t cover just the hits. This lifelong Joel devotee delves deep into the gregarious troubadour’s archives, with help from his peerless backing musicians. Close your eyes at a Turnstiles set, and you’ll believe you’re in a Billy Joel arena show. Since it’s at Royal Palm Place, we can’t say parking will be any easier than at the BB&T Center, but your kinship with Joel’s music will never seem more intimate.

SUNDAY, JAN. 1

What: “Something Big 2017”

Where: Mizner Park Amphitheater, 590 Plaza Real, Boca Raton

When: 11 a.m. (check-in begins at 10 a.m.)

Cost: Free

Contact: 561/479-7819, somethingbig2017.com

Let yoga be your New Year’s Eve hangover cure at this refreshing morning of stretches to live musical accompaniment. Renowned teacher Leslie Glickman of Yoga Journey will lead attendees through the routines. Last year, this event brought 1,500 people to the amphitheater, a number Glickman is hoping to top with this enhanced follow-up, complete with nationally touring artist DJ Drez and a marketplace of yoga products and gifts. Festivities run until 2:30 p.m.

trans-siberian-orchestra

The Week Ahead: Dec. 13-19

A solo theater piece re-creates “It’s a Wonderful Life” in 75 minutes, the Trans-Siberian Orchestra resurrects Christmas spirits, and Bret Baier keynotes the YMCA’s Prayer Breakfast. Plus, The Beach Boys, The Jingle Ball, “Avenue Q” and more in your week ahead.

 

WEDNESDAY

What: YMCA of the Palm Beaches’ Annual Prayer Breakfast

prayerbreakfastbretbaier

Where: The Breakers, 1 S. County Road, Palm Beach

When: 7:45 a.m.

Cost: $100, or $250 for VIP meet-and-greet tickets

Contact: 561/968-9622, ymcapalmbeaches.org

One of YMCA of the Palm Beaches’ most-beloved fundraisers, the Prayer Breakfast returns for its eighth annual morning of inspiration and community connection. Always able to attract first-rate keynote speakers, this year’s breakfast will feature a presentation by Fox News’ Chief Political Anchor Bret Baier, one of the cable news network’s least ideological voices in prime time. He will provide insights into the strange and expectation-defying election of 2016 and, perhaps more importantly for the YMCA’s message of prayer and positivity, will discuss his latest book “Special Heart: One Family’s Journey of Faith, Hope, Courage and Love,” a touching account of his son’s transformative battle with heart disease.

 

THURSDAY

What: Avi Bash book signing

avibash

Where: Murder on the Beach, 273 Pineapple Grove Way, Delray Beach

When: 7 p.m.

Cost: Free

Contact: 561/279-7790, murderonthebeach.com

Appealing to devotees of local history and true crime alike, mob historian Avi Bash’s new book, “Organized Crime in Miami,” explores the city’s rich history as a Mafia escape—a place where gangsters who built their empires elsewhere wintered, convalesced, partied and rebuilt their legacies. Al Capone is only the most famous example of the mobster-in-Miami-exile, but others flocked here, too—not just for the temperate weather but for the lax law enforcement and other factors. Bash’s book explores all of the ingredients that made Miami a mob Mecca dating back to the first quarter of the 20th century, supplementing his research with previously unpublished and rarely circulated photographs originating from police files, private family albums and newspaper archives.

 

What: The Beach Boys: Holidays & Hits

beach-boys

Where: Arsht Center, 1300 Biscayne Blvd., Miami

When: 8 p.m.

Cost: $59.50-$89.50

Contact: 305/949-6722, arshtcenter.org

“The Beach Boys Christmas,” from 1964, is one of the great holiday albums of its era, in which clever original songs like “The Man With All the Toys” and “Little Saint Nick” joined standards like “White Christmas” and “Frosty the Snowman,” all performed with the rollicking surf rhythms and four-part harmonies of the Boys’ iconic style. The Mike Love-fronted version of the band will play many of these seasonal favorites, along with non-holiday sing-alongs, in a yuletide gift for your ears.

 

FRIDAY

What: Trans-Siberian Orchestra

trans-siberian-orchestra

Where: BB&T Center, 1 Panther Parkway, Sunrise

When: 3:30 and 8 p.m.

Cost: $30-$70

Contact: 954/835-8000, thebbtcenter.com

Rock music—the epic, thunderous, grandiose rock music that only makes sense in pyrotechnic-friendly arenas—is a tradition that would seem at odds with holiday music, with its bouncy earworms and choral harmonies. But Trans-Siberian Orchestra has staked its career on merging the two forms on high-concept, elaborately conceived Christmas albums. For this tour, the group will revisit its narrative score for “The Ghosts of Christmas Eve,” a 1999 TV movie that will project on giant screens behind the band.

 

What: “This Wonderful Life”

SONY DSC

SONY DSC

Where: Kravis Center, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach

When: 7:30 p.m.

Cost: $39

Contact: 561/832-7469, kravis.org

Chameleonic actor Jeremy Kendall doesn’t need a $3 million budget and a cast of 50 to bring “It’s a Wonderful Life” to … life. His elastic body and his spectrum-spanning voice are enough, in this one-man re-creation of the uplifting holiday film. Kendall plays more than 32 characters, from George Bailey and Clarence the Angel to Mary and Zuzu, regularly breaking the fourth wall to comment on the action. It’s a 75-minute whirlwind that feels considerably leaner than Frank Capra’s 130-minute movie, updating its pace while retaining its deceptively simple message about the impact of life’s little things.

 

FRIDAY TO SUNDAY

What: “Avenue Q”

avenueq

Where: Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N. Swinton Ave., Delray Beach

When: 8 p.m. Friday, 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday

Cost: $42-$52

Contact: 561/243-7922, oldschoolsquare.org

“Avenue Q,” Robert Lopez and Jeff Marx’s hilarious, R-rated marionette musical with heart, is no stranger to South Florida stages, usually when it stops by on national tours. It is unusual for a local company to mount its own regional production, but the industrious Slow Burn Theatre Company has never balked at a challenge. The South Florida cast and crew built their own puppets and costumes, in a production that has already played a couple of regional venues and now stops by the Crest for a brief residency. By now, the actors have their puppeteering finesse down to a science, disappearing completely into parts like Kate Monster, a timid teacher looking for love, and Trekkie Monster, a shaggy recluse with an all-too-familiar Internet addiction.

 

SATURDAY

What: Screening of “Eyes Wide Shut” on 35mm

eyeswideshut

Where: O Cinema, 500 71st St., Miami Beach

When: 11:30 p.m.

Cost: $10

Contact: 786/207-1919, o-cinema.org

Moviegoers looking for a holiday film that is a bit more, shall we say, adventurous than the usual suspects can do no better than Stanley Kubrick’s unintended swan song, based on an erotic 1926 novella by Arthur Schnitzler. Set at Christmastime during a hedonistic 48 hours for affluent doctor Bill Harford (Tom Cruise), “Eyes Wide Shut” is a polarizing nocturnal odyssey through an unfamiliar New York, a film chockablock with deviant set pieces and unforgettable, symbolically loaded imagery that continues to fascinate conspiracy theorists to this day. One thing is for certain: A single viewing is never enough to comprehend this meticulously composed, deeply controversial work of art. And there’s no better opportunity to experience, or revisit, this modern classic than on its original 35mm format.

 

SUNDAY

What: Y100 Jingle Ball

jingleballtovelo

Where: The BB&T Center, 1 Panther Parkway, Sunrise

When: 7:30 p.m.

Cost: $46-$251

Contact: 954/835-8000, thebbtcenter.com

Pop festivals are for the young, so here’s a great way to test how old you’re getting: Look at the music lineup for Y100’s annual Jingle Ball concert, and count the number of artists you recognize. Chances are it will diminish every year—unless you have kids who groove to Top 40, in which case you have an unfair advantage. They might even be dragging you to The BB&T Center this weekend, which features performances by influential DJ/EDM pioneer Diplo, Sweden’s darkly confessional singer-songwriter Tove Lo (I’m familiar with those two, thank you very much), electronic duo The Chainsmokers, five-piece girl group Fifth Harmony, reggaeton singer Nicky Jam, Danish pop-soul act Lukas Graham, singer-actress Hailee Steinfeld and more. And if you are one of those dragged parents, be thankful for small favors: At least it’s not the Biebs.

artafterdark-jpandthesweets

The Week Ahead: Dec. 6-12

A beloved foodie fest converts to 3D, a holiday boat parade lights up the Intracoastal, and the Norton’s Art After Dark looks for new blueprints. Plus, Hasan Minhaj, Michael Chabon, “The Brand New Testament” and more in your week ahead.

 

TUESDAY

What: “Meaning & Metaphor: Seen & Unseen Narratives in the Lives of Women”

dorotha-lemeh-the-gateway-feature

Where: Armory Art Center, 1700 Parker Ave., West Palm Beach

When: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

Cost: $10

Contact: 561/832-1776, armoryart.org

Dorotha Lemeh, an artist and professor at Florida Atlantic University whose work has been exhibited more than 70 times nationally and on four continents, constructs photographs that explore the modern woman’s identifying narratives. Her female figures are juxtaposed against, or surrounded by, such images of surface beauty and entrapment as flowers, birds and cages, drawing connections to female archetypes in literature, history and mythology. Lemeh will discuss her heady, immaculate imagery, and the themes behind it, as part of the Armory’s First Tuesday of the month lecture series.

 

THURSDAY

What: Art After Dark: Young Professionals Night

artafterdark-jpandthesweets

Where: Norton Museum of Art, 1451 S. Olive Ave., West Palm Beach

When: 5 to 9 p.m.

Cost: Free

Contact: 561/832-5196, norton.org

Ironically, given the size of its canvases, architecture is one of the more invisible art forms: It’s so ingrained in the fabric of everyday travel that unless it’s an especially jaw-dropping or meretricious building, we hardly notice it. This may change if you attend the 6 p.m. lecture at this week’s Art After Dark program at the Norton, which features an in-depth conversation of architecture’s role in shaping a community’s sense of place, with local architects and experts Daniel Kahan and Alexander Ives, and Norton Deputy Director James Hall. The evening also includes a “Mapmaking” exercise, in which guests create their own blueprints while exploring the Norton’s exhibits; and a concert by local quintet JM & the Sweets, an eclectic band that draws from soul, funk, jazz, blues and pop. As always, the bar, featuring libations from Potion in Motion, will be open until 8:30 in the Central Courtyard.

 

THURSDAY TO SUNDAY

What: Palm Beach Food & Wine Festival

pbfoodwinefest

Where: Various county restaurants

When: Various event times

Cost: $75-$170 per event

Contact: 877/503-9463, pbfoodwinefest.com

You all have 3D glasses lying around the house, right? If so, strap ‘em on and visit pbfoodwinefest.com. The luxe foodie favorite is celebrating its 10th anniversary in three glorious dimensions, with a website that invades your space like a Hollywood blockbuster. (If only the site featured Smell-O-Vision, too, we might get a waft of the succulent fish, sizzling steaks and decadent desserts that will satisfy the palates of this festival’s lucky attendees.) And it’s not just the website that’s 3D: Attendees can sign up online for 3D glasses and partake in surprise multidimensional treats during the event. At any rate, with A-list toques like Daniel Boulud, Robert Irvine and Michelle Bernstein cheffing the fest, we don’t need much extra incentive. Many of the festival’s 14 events are sold out—and have been for some time—but tickets remain for “A Rustic Root” Dec. 8 at Avocado Grill, “Rise and Dine” Dec. 10 at Eau Palm Beach, “After Hours” Dec. 10 at Imoto, the annual Grand Tasting Dec. 11 at the Gardens Mall, and more.

 

FRIDAY

What: 45th Annual Holiday Boat Parade

boat-parade-charlie-pics-014

Where: Leaves the Boynton Beach Inlet and travels south on the Intracoastal to the C15 Canal in Delray Beach

When: Starts at 5:30 p.m.

Cost: Free

Contact: 561/600-9097, boyntonbeachcra.com

A flotilla of sea vessels, of all shapes and sizes and lit up for the season, will drift along the Intracoastal during this cherished holiday event. Viewing areas begin at the Boynton Harbor Marina and continue along the parade route, and viewers are encouraged to bring a new, unwrapped toy to contribute to Toys for Tots. U.S. Marines will stand by dockside to pick up toy donations.

 

What: Opening night of “The Brand New Testament”

Le tout nouveau testament

Where: Living Room Theaters at FAU, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton

When: Show times pending

Cost: $6.50-$9.50

Contact: 561/549-2600, fau.livingroomtheaters.com

“God exists. He lives in Belgium.” That’s the irresistible premise of this bawdy, irreverent, postmodern comedy from Belgian director Jaco Van Dormael. Like an Internet troll, Dormael’s petulant deity spends his days in front of his computer, wrecking minor havoc on the lives of his fellow countrymen—making their phones ring at inappropriate times, always ensuring the other supermarket lines move faster than the one they chose. His reign of power-abuse comes to a halt, however, when God’s 10-year-old daughter hacks into his account and leaks, for everyone in the world, the dates of their deaths. Much panic, fate-testing and anarchic humor ensues; there’s a subplot with Catherine Deneueve and a gorilla you won’t soon forget. “The Brand New Testament” also opens at the Classic Gateway Theater in Fort Lauderdale.

 

SATURDAY

What: Hasan Minhaj: “Homecoming King”

hasan-minhaj

Where: Broward Center, 201 S.W. Fifth Ave., Fort Lauderdale

When: 8 p.m.

Cost: $27.50-$37.50

Contact: 954/462-0222, browardcenter.org

In his day job, Minhaj is a “Daily Show” senior correspondent, bringing wit and commentary to topics ranging from papal visits to presidential politics. But he’s also a gifted standup comedian and monologist, as evidenced by his one-man show “Homecoming King,” touring the nation after its 2015 Off-Broadway premiere. It explores his autobiography as a first-generation Indian-American straddling two worlds in the U.S., where he grew up as “the one brown speck in [his] class photo.”

 

MONDAY

What: Michael Chabon

michaelchabon

Where: Books & Books, 265 Aragon Ave., Coral Gables

When: 7 p.m.

Cost: Free

Contact: 305/442-4408, booksandbooks.com

Michael Chabon, the award-winning novelist, defender of populist fiction, and chronicler of the inner worlds of religious and sexual minorities, is one of the more eccentric and complex best-selling authors of our time, whose credits include the WWII period opus The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay and the alternate-history mystery The Yiddish Policemen’s Union. His latest work, Moonglow, is also something of an imagined history novel—his own family’s. Inspired by a 1989 visit to the bedside of his dying grandfather, Chabon spun this teeming flashback narrative encompassing the life of an unnamed protagonist known simply as “my grandfather” as he unspools a life of buried history and dreamlike revelations. The journey spans Jewish slums to NASA to a Florida retirement community, in a work that is as fantastic as it is personal. It’s been called “an autobiography wrapped in a novel disguised as a memoir.” Chabon will parse some of these distinctions at this South Florida stop on his book tour.

clarke-stanley-50641f5367293

The Week Ahead: Nov. 29-Dec. 5

Courtney Love rocks the Arsht, Truman Capote holds court at Dramaworks, and Christmas comes to the Flagler Museum. Plus, Art Basel, Stanley Clarke, “The Who’s Tommy” and more in your week ahead.

WEDNESDAY

What: Opening night of “Kansas City Choir Boy”

kansascitychoirboy

Where: Arsht Center, 1300 Biscayne Blvd., Miami

When: 8 p.m.

Cost: $85

Contact: 305/949-6722, arshtcenter.org

The main draw of this hour-long rock musical—and the reason for that $85 ticket—isn’t the plot, which is a rather conventional boy-meets-girl, boy-loses-girl pine session. It’s the remarkable cast: Courtney Love, yes, that Courtney Love, of rock and roll fame/infamy, stars in the production alongside its composer-lyricist, Todd Almond. The latter plays a rudderless composer seeking inspiration, and perhaps finding it, when a news bulletin early in the play triggers memories of a girlfriend who went missing. That would be Love, whose vocal abilities haven’t waned a note since her days fronting Hole. The story, which borrows themes from ancient mythology, plays out in flashback and is told entirely through music, which ranges from electronic dance music to acoustic balladry. And it all goes down in the Carnival Studio Theatre, the Arsht Center’s most intimate of spaces. “Kansas City Choir Boy” runs through Dec. 11; get your tickets while you still can.

 

THURSDAY

What: Opening night of “The Who’s Tommy”

tommy

Where: Showtime Performing Arts, 503 S.E. Mizner Blvd., Boca Raton

When: 8 p.m.

Cost: $20-$40

Contact: 954/300-2149, outretheatrecompany.com

From a story originally conceived as a double-album by The Who in 1969, Pete Townshend helped elevate “Tommy” into a stage musical in the early ‘90s, which dramatizes the band’s iconic story about a deaf, dumb and mute child who becomes a pinball wizard to deal with his traumatic childhood. Featuring 20 scenes and more than 30 Who songs, it continues Outre Theatre Company’s ambitious return to Boca Raton. Mike Westrich leads an all-star cast in this regional production, which runs through Dec. 18.

 

THURSDAY TO SUNDAY

What: Art Basel Miami Beach

artbasel

Where: Miami Beach Convention Center, 1901 Convention Center Drive, Miami Beach

Cost: $34-$115

Contact: artbasel.com

Well, this one certainly crept up on us. Yes, it’s Basel weekend already, so South Florida’s art lovers have likely mapped out their schedule of hobnobbing with celebrities and cultural cognoscenti for a few days of state-of-the-art-world surveying. But if you’re still in tryptophan hangover, listen up: The heart of Miami Basel is once again the Convention Center, where 269 galleries from five continents will showcase a stunning array of work, from historical masterpieces to contemporary and emerging art, in media ranging from paintings and sculptures to installations, photography and film. Of course, festivities aren’t limited to the central location: During Art Miami Week, dozens of satellite fairs will sprout up all around the county’s hippest districts, and there will be music aplenty at the city’s clubs, mostly of the electronic persuasion. If you’re not into art, nightclubbing or hair-pulling traffic nightmares, it’s probably best not to venture south of the 954 for the next few days.

 

FRIDAY

What: Opening night of “Tru”

Rob Donohoe as Truman Capote (Tru, 2016)

Rob Donohoe as Truman Capote (Tru, 2016)

Where: Palm Beach Dramaworks, 201 Clematis St., West Palm Beach

When: 8 p.m.

Cost: $81 ($66 for future performances)

Contact: 561/514-4042, palmbeachdramaworks.org

The title of this 1989 play isn’t a misprint: It’s the diminutive for Truman Capote, the masterful and eccentric writer, who shares a stage with no one but himself and a copious amount of pills, vodka, cocaine and chocolate truffles for a couple of saucy hours. Jay Presson Allen’s workhorse of a play finds Capote reminiscing about his life and rollercoaster career during one of its seemingly endless valleys—a week before Christmas 1975, In Cold Blood far in his rearview mirror, reeling after a published excerpt of his score-settling roman a clef “Answered Prayers.” Lonely and alienated, Presson’s version of Capote still retains much of his acid wit, in a play that is designed as much for Tru newbies as longtime admirers. As much as anything else, “Tru” is an extraordinary actor’s exercise. In Palm Beach Dramaworks’ production, Rob Donohoe, who received a pair of Carbonell nominations this past year, will transform into the turbulent wordsmith. The play runs through Jan. 1.

 

SATURDAY

What: Second Annual Willy T. Willard Memorial Fundraiser

Where: Church on the Hill Congregational, 251 S.W. Fourth Ave., Boca Raton

When: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Cost: Free

Contact: willytwillardmemorialfund.com

Ever think about expanding your spiritual horizons but don’t know where to start? Begin to get enlightened for a great cause at this eclectic spiritual fair benefiting the Willy T. Willard Memorial Fund. Running in two rooms, the event includes spirit card readings, a Reiki circle meditation, sound healing, two sessions of chair yoga, qigong energetic healing, a wellness lecture/workshop and an “Archangel Board” talking-board instruction session with local resident and board inventor Dr. Yafi Yair. Bring the kids for face painting and arts and crafts activities, and leave time to visit the more than 30 vendors, including local artists and small businesses. The free event runs on donations and raffle ticket/silent auction funds, which provide financial support to bereaved parents. Visit the fund’s website for a complete breakdown of events.

 

What: Opening day of “When Modern Was Contemporary: Selections From the Roy R. Neuberger Collection”

Where: Society of the Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach

When: 10 a.m.

Cost: $5 guests, free for Four Arts members

Contact: 561/655-7226, fourarts.org

Wherever modern art was happening in the movement’s earliest incarnations, Roy R. Neuberger was there. Noticing that the 20th century modern-art nexus was beginning to shift from Paris to New York, the generous American collector Neuberger ended his five-year residency in France to follow the zeitgeist. On his entry-level Wall Street Job, he was able to purchase works by then-emerging figures in the modern art movement, insisting on buying working artists as way to support their endeavors. Many of these now-iconic names will fill the walls of the Society of the Four Arts beginning this weekend, in a sizable celebration of Neuberger and his prescient taste in art: Expect to see Willem de Kooning, Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Stuart Davis, Georgia O’Keeffe, Edward Hopper, Adolph Gottlieb and many more. The show runs through Jan. 29.

 

SUNDAY

What: Christmas at Whitehall

Where: Flagler Museum, 1 Whitehall Way, Palm Beach

When: Starting at 2 p.m.

Cost: Free with museum admission; $10-$28 for lecture

Contact: 561/655-2833, flaglermuseum.us

Henry Flagler’s youngest descendants will light the 16-foot tree in his namesake museum’s Grand Hall, in this traditional Gilded Age throwback that also includes an afternoon of organ and piano music and holiday caroling. A lively lecture by Alex Palmer about the colorful history of letter-writing to Santa—and a fraudulent “Santa Claus Association” in New York that attempted to answer them—kicks off the festivities at 2 p.m.

 

What: Stanley Clarke

clarke-stanley-50641f5367293

Where: Broward Center, 201 S.W. Fifth Ave., Fort Lauderdale

When: 7 p.m.

Cost: $39.50-$60

Contact: 954/462-0222, browardcenter.org

Legend has it that as a schoolboy, Stanley Clarke arrived late to music class, selecting the acoustic bass because it was one of the few instruments that wasn’t already picked. Fate worked in his favor: Over a diverse 40-year career, this jazz fusionist has become the foremost virtuoso of this undervalued instrument as a soloist, bandleader and sideman whose collaborators have ranged from Al Jarreau to Michael Jackson to Beck.

melissa-etheridge

The Week Ahead: Nov. 22-28

Mizner Park lights its “iTree,” the Wick Theatre gets back in the habit, and a pair of experts debate the Kennedy Assassination. Plus, Melissa Etheridge, “Aliens,” new art at PAMM and more in your week ahead.

 

TUESDAY

What: “Who Killed John F. Kennedy”

Where: Books and Books, 265 Aragon Ave., Coral Gables

When: 7 p.m.

Cost: Free

Contact: 305/442-4408, booksandbooks.com

On the 53rd anniversary of the JFK assassination, Books and Books is welcoming two investigators who have contributed to the endless volume of literature on the subject. The notorious Roger Stone, a political rabble-rouser and adviser to Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, will defend his conspiracy tome “The Man Who Killed Kennedy: The Case Against LBJ,” and Gerald Posner, a dogged investigative journalist, will speak on “Case Closed,” which supports the Warren Commission and the single-assassin theory. Glenn Garvin of the Miami Herald will moderate a debate between these two best-selling authors. Whether the conversation will remain civil or devolve into chair-throwing remains to be seen; just keep your smartphone cameras at the ready.

 

WEDNESDAY

What: Holiday Tree Lighting

Where: Mizner Park Amphitheater, 590 Plaza Real, Boca Raton

When: 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.

Cost: Free

Contact: 561/393-7807, myboca.us

Mizner Park’s Christmas tree is so 21st century. The so-called “iTree,” which will be unveiled Wednesday evening near Lord & Taylor, is a marvelous combination of the organic and the digital, boasting more than 32,000 lifelike PVC branches and 25,000 clear and multicolored LED lights, along with clusters of ornaments and red and gold bows. A 20-minute musical light show will illuminate the park nightly, every hour, from 6 to 9 p.m. through the holiday season. But the “iTree” isn’t the only festive addition to Mizner; 50,000 LED lights will adorn 75 palm trees throughout the complex. Garland, lights and holiday trimmings will be everywhere, and four wreaths—each 60 inches in diameter—will be placed throughout the facility. Celebrate the yuletide cheer at this tree lighting celebration, which includes artificial snow, carnival rides, fireworks and a family-friendly stage show, with food and Santa sessions available for purchase.

 

What: South Florida Musicians Assistance Foundation benefit concert

Where: Funky Biscuit, 303 S.E. Mizner Blvd., Boca Raton

When: 7 p.m.

Cost: $20-$40

Contact: 561/395-2929, funkybiscuit.com

An area’s best musicians are often the area’s most starving musicians, because rocking well doesn’t always pay the bills. These include health care costs, which are on the rise—and that’s where South Florida Musicians Assistance Foundation comes in. Launched in 2014 after the death of multi-instrumentalist and SoFla music pillar Corey Dwyer, the SFMAF pools funds to assist the medical bills of local musicians who otherwise can’t afford them, and much of its reservoir comes from this annual fundraising concert at the beloved Funky Biscuit. Three of the biggest names in the local scene will perform for your well-directed dollars: Crazy Fingers, the nationally acclaimed Grateful Dead tribute artists; Albert Castiglia, the veteran blues-rock virtuoso; and Bluestone, David Shelley’s bluesy hot rock project. “Other special guests” may turn up as well for the cause.

 

FRIDAY

What: Opening day of “Jillian Mayer: Slumpies”

jillianmayer

Where: Perez Art Museum Miami, 1103 Biscayne Blvd., Miami

When: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Cost: $12-$16

Contact: 305/375-3000, pamm.org

So what is a “Slumpie,” you may ask? It’s neither the latest sugary calorie bomb from 7-11 nor an innovation in thermal blanketing. A “Slumpie” is an awkward, deliberately meretricious piece of sculptural furniture, designed by artist Jillian Mayer as a sojourn for iPhone zombies. Inspired by research suggesting that smartphone users spend an average of 4.7 hours a day staring at their devices, Mayer’s satirical yet functional “Slumpies” are glitter-bedecked retro-futuristic respites for the perennially distracted to unplug from real-life and bask in handheld data. Comprised of materials such as fiberglass, resin, enamel and Amazon Prime cardboard boxes, “Slumpies” are a hilarious solution to a problem that shouldn’t exist; it’s no surprise their artist was inspired in part by Skymall merchandise, the now-defunct standard-bearer in superfluous gadgetry. PAMM visitors are invited to utilize the “Slumpies” on the museum’s Vattikuti Learning Theater and outdoor terrace. The exhibition runs through Jan. 22.

 

SATURDAY

What: Opening night of “Sister Act”

sisteract

Where: The Wick, 7901 N. Federal Highway, Boca Raton

When: 7:30 p.m.

Cost: $80 ($75 for future performances)

Contact: 561/995-2333, thewick.org

“Sister Act,” the 1992 fish-out-of-water movie starring Whoopi Goldberg, became one of the most successful comedies of the early ‘90s, earning more than $230 million dollars off its clever premise: A hard-living Reno nightclub singer, fleeing her vindictive mobster boyfriend, enters the witness protection program by joining a convent. Cue the culture-clashing comedy. With Goldberg’s imprimatur, “Sister Act” was adapted as a stage musical in 2006, and by the time it reached Broadway in 2011, it was en route to becoming an international feel-good hit. Composer Alan Mencken, who penned the scores for stage musicals like “Beauty and the Beast” and “Newsies,” wrote the music, and the witty playwright Douglas Carter Beane contributed to the book. In this regional premiere, The Wick’s largely local cast includes familiar faces Jessica Brooke Sanford, Margot Morland, Meredith Bartmon and Leah Sessa. It runs through Dec. 17.

 

What: Screening of “Aliens”

aliens

Where: O Cinema, 500 71st St., Miami Beach

When: 11:30 p.m.

Cost: $10

Contact: 786/207-1919, o-cinema.org

If Ridley Scott’s original “Alien,” from 1979, was a claustrophobic horror film, James Cameron’s 1986 sequel was a relentless antiwar actioner—two hours and 17 minutes of blast-furnace carnage that resonated with the still-present aftershocks of the Vietnam War. Sigourney Weaver, who earned an Academy Award nomination for her performance, returns as iconic alien slayer Ellen Ripley. She launches back to the planet of hostile stomach-invaders, only this time with a team of elite space marines to back her up. Written and directed by a still-somewhat-humble, pre-King of the World Cameron, “Aliens” is a genre classic that has stands up powerfully to repeated viewings. See it for the first time, or enjoy it again, at this one-time-only 35mm screening.

 

MONDAY, NOV. 28

What: Melissa Etheridge

Where: Kravis Center, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach

melissa-etheridge

When: 8 p.m.

Cost: $20-$100

Contact: 561/832-7469, kravis.org

Fresh off her Memphis Rock and Soul Tour, which featured the celebrated folk-rocker covering soulful compositions by Otis Redding, Sam & Dave and other genre staples, Melissa Etheridge is jumping right back into the touring grind, this time with a holiday trio. In 2008, Etheridge released “A New Thought for Christmas,” one of the more distinctive holiday albums of the Aughts, which featured seasonal standards like “Blue Christmas” and “O Night Divine” with original compositions such as “Christmas in America” and “Light a Light.” The mix of religious and secular, old and new, was meant to “bridge our old oppressive cultural ways with the enlightenment of our coming future.” She’ll continue to build that bridge on this tour, which features her Christmas cuts alongside megahits like “Come to My Window” and “I’m the Only One.”

neildegrasse

The Week Ahead: Nov. 15-21

A theatrical mystery dazzles at the Kravis, a star astrophysicist goes to the movies, and celebs swing rackets for charity in Delray. Plus, Bernie Sanders, Peter Hook & The Light, VoicePlay and more in your week ahead.

TUESDAY

Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, The Ethel Barrymore Theatre ALEXANDER SHARP TAYLOR TRENSCH FRANCESCA FARIDANY IAN BARFORD ENID GRAHAM HELEN CAREY MERCEDES HERRERO RICHARD HOLLIS BEN HORNER JOCELYN BIOH DAVID MANIS KEREN DUKES STEPHANIE ROTH HABERLE TOM PATRICK STEPHENS Production Credits: Marianne Elliott (Direction) Bunny Christie (Scenic and Costume Design) Paule Constable (Lighting Design) Ian Dickinson for Autograph (Sound Design) Finn Ross (Video Design) Scott Graham and Steven Hoggett for Frantic Assembly (Movement) Adrian Sutton (Music) Other Credits: Written by: Adapted by Simon Stephens from the novel by Mark Haddon

What: Opening night of “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time”

Where: Kravis Center, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach

When: 8 p.m.

Cost: $27-$75

Contact: 561/832-7469, kravis.org

This Tony-winning adaptation of Mark Haddon’s acclaimed novel is the only nonmusical in the Kravis’ 2016-17 Broadway season, but with the amount of razzle-dazzle onstage, it’s hard to tell the difference. Electrifying special effects and an immersive scenic design place viewers inside the quantum brain of a 15-year-old mathematical genius who resides on the autism spectrum. When he’s accused of killing his neighbor’s dog, he sets out to discover the real culprit, despite opposition from neighbors and his vindictive father. Elaborate video projections and choreography coalesce in a shocking climax. It runs through Sunday.

 

WEDNESDAY

neildegrasse

What: Neil deGrasse Tyson

Where: Broward Center, 201 S.W. Fifth Ave., Fort Lauderdale

When: 8 p.m.

Cost: $45-$250

Contact: 954/462-0222, browardcenter.org

As director of New York’s Hayden Planetarium and host of Fox’s “Cosmos” edutainment series, Tyson is the closest thing the world of astrophysics has to a rock star. Now, like real rockers, he’s going on tour, as a starry-eyed film critic: In “An Astrophysicist Goes to the Movies,” he’ll break down the scientific blunders—including his now-notorious dissection of the Oscar winner “Gravity”—as well as the refreshing accuracies in sci-fi staples from “Star Wars” to “The Martian.”

Friday

christine-movie

What: Opening night of “Christine”

Where: Living Room Theaters at FAU, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton

When: Starting at 2 p.m.

Cost: $6.50-$9.50

Contact: 561/549-2600, fau.livingroomtheaters.com

Back in 1974, news reporter Christine Chubbuck was the victim of one of the most stunning and tragic events in television history: a suicide committed live on the air, from her anchor desk at a Sarasota news station. An ace reporter riven by depression and social awkwardness, her story was said to have inspired the character of Howard Beale in “Network,” but it’s only now, more than 40 years after her death, that Hollywood has attempted to tell her story with any degree of accuracy. Underrated art-house actor Rebecca Hall plays Christine in this critically acclaimed biopic, whose subject is as much the increasing “bleeds-it-leads” sensationalism of the news as it is the tortured woman forced to report it.

 

voiceplaypress5

What: VoicePlay

Where: Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N. Swinton Ave., Delray Beach

When: 8 p.m.

Cost: $15 students, $25 adults

Contact: 561/243-7922, oldschoolsquare.org

A cappella choirs, which used to be popular mostly on college campuses—uniting the nerds and the frat brothers in four-part harmony—have spread to the mainstream and beyond, thanks to groups like Pentatonix and films like “Pitch Perfect.” Orlando’s VoicePlay, with its five charismatic goofballs, typifies the genre. The group began as a street-corner barbershop-style quintet and achieved national notoriety by lasting into the sixth round of NBC’s “The Sing-Off” competition series. The bandmates’ ability to simulate all the instrumental colors of an electro-rock symphony with only their vocal chords is tops in the genre, and their set lists are sprinkled with a variety of Top 40 hits (“Ride,” “Wrecking Ball,” “Get Lucky”), durable oldies and spirited cameos from Bollywood and Broadway. Their take on “The Phantom of the Opera” is downright majestic.

 

peter-hook-credit-mark-mcnulty

What: Peter Hook & The Light

Where: Culture Room, 3045 N. Federal Highway, Fort Lauderdale

When: 8 p.m.

Cost: $25

Contact: 954/564-1074, cultureroom.net

Peter Hook played bass in two of the most important alternative bands in the genre’s roughly 40-year history: Joy Division, Manchester’s masters of brooding post-punk; and New Order, the synthpop sensations that emerged from Joy Division’s short-lived cult reign. These days, Hook is dedicated to preserving the legacy of both bands at their career apexes, often performing their entire albums with his reverential backing band, The Light. His current tour is particularly special because it borrows evenly from both groups, and it draws its set list from each band’s famed singles collections, “Joy Division: Substance” and “New Order: Substance.” For the latter, this means a glorious greatest-hits collection from “Blue Monday” to “Bizarre Love Triangle” to “Ceremony;” and for the former it means a selection of rarely played B-sides and non-album tracks, including “Transmission” and the heartbreaking “Atmosphere.” Expect upwards of 30 songs with an intermission.

 

FRIDAY TO SUNDAY

chrisevert2016_500b

What: Chris Evert/Raymond James Pro-Celebrity Tennis Classic

Where: Delray Beach Tennis Center, 201 W. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, and other venues

When: Various event times

Cost: Varies per event

Contact: 561/394-2400, chrisevert.org

Palm Beach resident Jimmy Buffett is a notoriously hermetic celebrity, rarely venturing into the public spotlight. So the fact that he’s listed among the players at the 2016 Chris Evert Pro-Celebrity Tennis Classic is as rare as it is exciting for his throngs of fans. He’s one of 20 entertainers who will swing a racket for charity this weekend at this beloved annual tournament, joining a star-studded roster that includes actors Jon Lovitz, Alan Thicke, Shawn Hatosy, Scott Foley and Timothy Olyphant; renaissance man Randy Jackson; singer-songwriter David Cook; retired tennis champs Martina Navratilova and Evert herself; and more. The on-court action goes down during the day on Saturday and Sunday, but tournament festivities run the length of the weekend, from the Friday night cocktail reception at the Boca Raton Resort & Club to the posh Pro-Celebrity Gala on Saturday evening, also at the Boca Resort. Visit the website for complete details and pricing.

 

SATURDAY

berniesanders

What: “An Evening With Bernie Sanders”

Where: Chapman Conference Center Building at Miami-Dade College, 300 N.E. Second Ave., Miami

When: 6:30 p.m.

Cost: Free

Contact: 305/237-3258, miamibookfair.com

Over the past year and a half, the Independent senator from Vermont mounted one of the most successful insurgent campaigns in history by anybody’s metric—and though he secured neither his party’s nomination nor the presidency, he energized millions of progressives who are looking to continue his agenda of democratic socialism. His new book Our Revolution: A Future to Believe In lays out an activist’s roadmap to do just that. Sanders, expected to be the biggest draw at this year’s Miami Book Fair, will discuss his book and his historic campaign at this presentation. The event is free but ticketed, and here’s the bad news: Every seat has been claimed. Interested attendees can wait in a standby line; empty seats will be released first-come, first-served at 6:20 p.m. If all else fails, Sanders’ speech will be streamed live in Room 3209 (Building 3, Second Floor), Room 3314 (Building 3, Third Floor) and The Porch (Northwest corner of N.E. 3rd Street and 2nd Avenue).

bookfairtrevornoah

The Week Ahead: Nov. 8 to Nov. 14

Alternative headliners rock out for Chipotle, footballers and chefs grill-off for charity, and “cuddly” vampires bring bite to Arts Garage. Plus, Mitski, Elle King, “Carmen” and more in your week ahead.

 

FRIDAY

elle-king-435

What: Elle King

Where: Revolution Live, 100 Nugent Ave., Fort Lauderdale

When: 7 p.m.

Cost: $28.50 advance, $30 at door

Contact: 954/449-1025, jointherevolution.net

The daughter of comedian Rob Schneider, Elle King has come a long way since appearing in her father’s 1999 comedy “Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo.” With her raspy voice and soaring notes, the 26-year-old singer-songwriter is still reaping the benefits of her stratospheric debut album “Love Stuff,” whose lead single “Exes and Ohs”—a witty, hook-laden and sexually suggestive catalog of the men she’s loved and left—catapulted to No. 1 on the Hot Rock charts. See the tattooed megastar effortlessly weave country, rock and blues in this intimate venue.

 

SATURDAY

everydaygreenexpo

What: Everyday Green Festival

Where: Quiet Waters Park, 401 S. Powerline Road, Deerfield Beach

When: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Cost: Free

Contact: 954/357-5113, broward.org/parks

Earth Day may have passed months ago, but as this fall festival suggests, we should be thinking green every day. The fourth-annual event celebrates and promotes all things eco friendly, from sustainable food to earth-friendly home accouterments. Activities run the length of the festival, from a pre-fest “Rock the Waters” canoe race at 9 a.m. to raffles at 1:30 p.m. In between, enjoy a native plant sale, a “Create-an-Eco-Mural” session with an eco-artist, and a Pet Parade. All day, stock up on organic nosh at the Local Food Farm-to-Fork Fair and check out the myriad vendors of handmade gifts and art. The first 500 attendees receive a complimentary reusable shopping bag and a native tree.

offerdahls

What: John Offerdahl’s Broward Health Gridiron Grill-Off Food and Wine Festival

Where: Pompano Beach Amphitheater, 1801 N.E. Sixth St., Pompano Beach

When: 1 to 4 p.m.

Cost: $85 general, $200 for “Luxe Experience”

Contact: gridirongrilloff.com

We at Boca magazine love the fresh salads and sammies of Offerdahl’s, the mini restaurant chain founded by the former Miami Dolphins linebacker. So any event that bears the Offerdahl’s imprimatur already has us at hello—and the fact that 100 percent of its net proceeds benefit charitable recipients like 4KIDS of South Florida and Place of Hope only sweetens the deal. Food, charity and football take center stage in this seventh-annual favorite, in which 25 Dolphins legends pair up with top local chefs to cook dishes vying for Judges’ Choice and Fan Favorite awards. To find out what OJ McDuffie and Hard Rock Café chef Carlos Velez concoct, or the entrée Keith Sims and Café Vico’s Marco Vico whip up, you’ll just have to turn out for this great cause. Stick around for the cornhole competition, Sustainable Seafood Village, silent action, live entertainment and more.

carmen_300x500_images

What: Opening night of Florida Grand Opera’s “Carmen”

Where: Arsht Center, 1300 Biscayne Blvd., Miami

When: 5:30 p.m.

Cost: $25-$229

Contact: 305/949-6722, fgo.org

It’s hard to imagine the outcry that met Georges Bizet’s “Carmen” in 1875. Its coterie of gypsies, peasants, smugglers and lower-class factory workers contrasted with the aristocratic milieus of most western operas. But “Carmen” was dirty, sexy and liberated, with a female title character that scandalized the populace by unapologetically choosing between two men: a naïve soldier and a glamorous toreador. Bizet died within months of its premiere and never witnessed its canonization. These days, according to Florida Grand Opera, no opera is more requested or anticipated. It runs through Nov. 19.

chipotlecultivate

What: Chipotle Cultivate Festival

Where: Bayfront Park Amphitheater, 301 Biscayne Blvd., Miami

When: Begins at 11 a.m.

Cost: Free

Contact: chipotlecultivate.com

Combine SunFest with the South Beach Wine & Food Festival, and you have some idea of what to expect from this celebration of nutritious cuisine and alternative music. Chipotle has been spreading awareness about the benefits of organic diets through its Cultivate festivals for the past six years, but this month marks its Miami debut. It features games, activities and exhibits; live demonstrations from such top local toques as Michael Schwarz, Richard Blais and Michelle Bernstein; and sets from alt-rockers Capital Cities, St. Lucia, Phases and more.

mitski

What: Mitski

Where: Gramps, 176 N.W. 24th St., Miami

When: 9 p.m.

Cost: $12-$15

Contact: gramps.com

The biracial singer-songwriter Mitski describes her identity as “half Japanese, half American, but not fully either,” a fluid sensibility that continues to inform this SUNY Purchase music graduate’s confessional, beguiling, intensely affecting music. The 26-year-old sensation released a pair of independent albums in the Aughts before breaking through with 2014’s beautiful and noisy “Bury Me at Makeout Creek,” and officially cementing her hipster cred with this year’s “Puberty 2,” an album that you’ll see on copious Best of the Year roundups next month. Some songs are fiery, noisy spasms of frustrated id; others suggest the slow-burning, art-folk ballads of St. Vincent. Still others channel the deadpan, self-questioning feminist wit of early Liz Phair and Helium, and while performing live, her voice can adopt the measured ululations of Alanis Morrissette at her most impassioned. There is much spectacle in both her stage performances—watch her NPR Tiny Desk concert, in which she howls directly into her anthropomorphized guitar strings—and her innovative music videos, like her sexy, cerebral and vulnerable concept for “Your Best American Girl.” I know Wynwood is a schlep, and Mitski might not take the stage until 10:30 or 11 p.m., but make the effort: This is likely to be one South Florida’s best shows of the year.

 

SUNDAY

cuddles

What: Opening night of “Cuddles”

Where: Arts Garage, 180 N.E. First St., Delray Beach

When: 2 p.m.

Cost: $40

Contact: 561/450-6357, artsgarage.org

OK, so you’re over the whole vampire thing, and frankly, so are we. “Twilight” and “True Blood” were so early-2000s, and by the time hordes of blood-sucking coffin-dwellers were being bludgeoned by Abraham Lincoln, you could consider the vampire shark jumped. But British playwright Joseph Wilde’s “Cuddles” is no ordinary example of sex-and-gore vampire schlock. It’s a psychologically disturbing character study and anti-fairytale that touches on themes of sacrifice, family bonding, overprotection and self-determination. Most older sisters look after their inexperienced kin, but not like the siblings in Wilde’s phantasmagoric drama: The younger Eve is a teenage vampire timelessly stunted with an adolescent mind, and she resides in a squalid, blood-spattered dungeon, trapped from sunlight and prying eyes by the elder Tabby, who opens her veins to feed Eve. By day, Tabby works in the corporate rat race, whose cutthroat implications parallel a vampire’s need to suck the world dry. A scary, satirical and mordantly funny look at contemporary consumerism, “Cuddles” is biting in more ways than one. Preview begin Sunday, and the show runs through Dec. 3.

bookfairtrevornoah

What: Opening day of Miami Book Fair

Where: Chapman Conference Center at Miami-Dade College, 300 N.E. Second Ave., Miami

When: Starts at 4 p.m.

Cost: Sometimes free; ticketed events vary

Contact: 305/237-3258, miamibookfair.com

With its stellar lineup of both marquee guests and established and emerging authors of all genres, the Miami Book Fair proves once again that it’s not difficult to lure celebrity authors, politicos, thinkers and comedians to the temperate climes of South Florida in November. Jorge Ramos, the celebrated Univision journalist, will kick off the festival at 4 p.m. Sunday with a free Spanish-language presentation with live English translation. He’ll be followed, in Miami-Dade College’s Auditorium, by best-selling children’s author Eoin Colfer at 5 p.m., discussing, among other things, his latest Marvel-inspired young-adult novel, Iron Man: The Gauntlet. At 6 p.m., back at the Chapman, festivities continue with one of the fest’s biggest draws: “Daily Show” host Trevor Noah, one of South Africa’s favorite sons, who will discuss his memoir Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood. This event is $40, and tickets include a copy of the book. The hits keep coming on Monday, Nov. 14, with $15 ticketed events from political analyst James Carville and renaissance performer Alan Cumming.

fitz

The Week Ahead: Nov. 1-7

A Davie-raised comedian returns to South Florida as a star headliner, Arts Garage welcomes “New Orleans Big Brass Circus Rock,” and FLIFF launches with a member of the Coppola legacy. Plus, Fitz & the Tantrums, The Edwards Twins and more in your week ahead.

THURSDAY TO SUNDAY

mike-lawrence

What: Mike Lawrence

Where: Fort Lauderdale Improv, 5700 Seminole Way, Hollywood

When: Various show times

Cost: $20 with a two-drink minimum

Contact: 954/981-5653, improvftl.com

It feels surreal writing this preview of comedian Mike Lawrence, because Mike hails from Davie, and he and I were best friends in high school—two borderline-Asperger’s, old movie-quoting pop-culture geeks who were always the smartest guys in the room about subjects of little consequence. At the time, he was a sterling slam poet at venues like Dada, and I remember his conversion to standup as no less artistically fulfilling. Recalling his embryonic, unpaid performances at forgotten Broward County bars like the Mental Ward, it’s no surprise that the rest of the world eventually took notice—first with appearances on Conan O’Brien and “John Oliver’s New York Standup Show,” then the first of many appearances on “@Midnight,” and briefly on NBC’s most recent season of “Last Comic Standing.” He wasn’t selected, which was the network’s loss: His no-holds-barred, intellectual humor has made him a hit on the alt-comedy circuit and has spawned writing gigs for “Inside Amy Schumer” and the MTV Movie Awards. See this distinctively bearded local-boy-done-good at his first South Florida headlining show this weekend.

 

FRIDAY

fitz

What: Fitz & the Tantrums

Where: Revolution Live, 103 S.W. Third Ave., Fort Lauderdale

When: 7:30 p.m.

Cost: $29.50 advance, $32 day of show

Contact: 954/449-1025, jointherevolution.net

The “Fitz” in this hot Los Angeles alt-rock sextet is former sound engineer Michael Fitzpatrick, who had a solid reason to form his band, The Tantrums, in 2008: so he could “not lose his mind over a breakup.” Fitz and the Tantrums were borne of financial hardship as well as heartache: Fitzpatrick pooled his life savings into the recording of the group’s debut EP, which has turned into an investment well spent. The band’s debut LP, “Pickin’ up the Pieces,” would top the Billboard Heatseekers charts, and its two follow-ups have continued its remarkable ascent, capped by this year’s sing-along anthem “Handclap.” If there is a secret to FATT’s success, it’s their shrewd disregard for the restrictions of genre, swiftly oscillating between ‘60s rock ‘n’ roll, soul, disco and electronica with the occasional dollop of hip-hop, delivered in a riveting live show that continues to earn them new fans by the day.

 

fliff-dreamland

What: Opening night of Fort Lauderdale International Film Festival

Where: Hard Rock Live, 1 Seminole Way, Hollywood

When: 7:30 p.m.

Cost: $6-$25

Contact: 954/525-3456, fliff.com

South Florida’s longest film festival will once again present more than 150 features, documentaries and shorts celebrating their local, national or world premieres. It all kicks off Friday with the star-studded opening night film “Dreamland,” a comedy about a penniless, aspirational musician whose integrity is tested when he meets a glamorous femme fatale willing to realize his dreams—at a cost. Writer-director Robert Schwartzman, of the Coppola cinema legacy, will attend Friday’s screening and party, along with stars Talia Shire, Beverly D’Angelo and more. As the festival continues through Nov. 20, there will be a special international focus, which includes a French night (Nov. 5), an Italian night (Nov. 7), a Brit night (Nov. 12) and an Israeli day (Nov. 13). A series of Veteran’s Day films will screen all day in Sunrise Nov. 11, including the Brad Pitt vehicle “Fury.” And on Nov. 7, the eve of the presidential election, the festival will premiere “Chief Zabu,” an unreleased ‘80s movie, finally completed in 2016, that contains eerie parallels to the rise of Donald Trump. Visit the festival’s website for complete details.

transphysics

What: Opening day of “transphysics: istwa, landscapes, paisajes”

Where: Art and Culture Center of Hollywood, 1650 Harrison St., Hollywood

When: Noon to 4 p.m.

Cost: $7 adults, $4 students, seniors and children

Contact: 954/921-3274, artandculturecenter.org

This exhibition with an inscrutable title grows more accessible when you understand its subject matter: four generations of South Florida artists whose work is formed by—and informs—our geography, our climate, our multicultural community. Revered artist William Cordova curated this historical survey, which includes work by pioneering outsider artist Purvis Young, the ethnobotanist and photographer Onajide Shabaka and many more.

 

SATURDAY

dirty-bopurbon

What: Dirty Bourbon River Show

Where: Arts Garage, 180 N.E. First St., Delray Beach

When: 8 p.m.

Cost: $30-$45

Contact: 561/450-6357, artsgarage.org

We’re not entirely sure what “New Orleans Big Brass Circus Rock” means, but that’s the invented style the Dirty Bourbon River Show inhabits. The fact that this Big Easy quintet needed to invent its own genre tells a lot about its eclectic style, which has been evident across a whopping nine albums over six years. At its most traditional, it’s a brass band, with trumpet, baritone sax and Sousaphone jazzily featured among the traditional electric guitars, bass and drums. But then again, grizzled frontman Noah Adams is an accordion virtuoso, and one of the group’s albums is a solo accordion LP. His voice also carries the gravel of Tom Waits, leading his ensemble through colorful and quirky material that conjures the Dirty Dozen Brass Band one minute and the Residents the next. The band’s song titles, like “Ballad of Oompa Soca Man and the Orangutan Factory” and “Jewish Girls Who Went to Art School Know All the Angles” further contribute to the circus-like humor of these singular showmen.

 

SATURDAY AND SUNDAY

edwardstwins

What: The Edwards Twins

Where: Boca Black Box, 8221 Glades Road, No. 10, Boca Raton

Cost: $30-$45

Contact: 561/483-9036, bocablackbox.org

Chameleonic identical twins Anthony and Eddie Edwards not only look exactly like each other; they can look precisely like 150 other people, too. The natural entertainers honed their imitative sensibilities as children, watching and then re-creating, to an eerie T, the comedy bits from “Laugh-In” and “The Carol Burnett Show.” As adults, they’ve established a peerless brand of impersonation cultivated over more than 20 years, with the Edwards Twins’ transformations not limited to Cher, Billy Joel, Stevie Wonder, Barbra Streisand, Kermit the Frog, Elton John, Elvis Presley, Pavarotti and countless more. And they’re more than just vocal mimics: The twins make a point to visually embody their subjects, too, even if it means donning false teeth and wearing the stars’ actual clothing, the purchase of which initially landed them in debt. Now, their act, and their art, has been perfected to a science, and it needs to be seen to be believed.

 

SUNDAY

completehistoryofamerica

What: “The Complete History of America (Abridged)”

Where: Bailey Hall at Broward College, 3501 Davie Road, Davie

When: 7 p.m.

Cost: $20-$38

Contact: 954/201-6884, baileyhall.org/events

If every history-studying pupil received his or her tutelage from this madcap comedy instead of textbooks … they probably wouldn’t know much, but they’d likely enjoy class a heck of a lot more. “The Complete History of America (Abridged)” is the latest touring production from the Reduced Shakespeare Company, a troupe that, to understate the obvious, trims the excess from whatever subject they’re satirizing. The company has truncated the Bard’s entire corpus into a one-act comedy and has also condensed the histories of sports and Hollywood into riotous, pop-culture-savvy shows. So the history of this great American experiment? Piece of cake. As the comic actors traverse “600 years in 6,000 seconds,” expect to see Lewis and Clark expediting as a comedy duo, the Lincoln assassination reenacted as a Matrix-style follow-the-bullet slow-motion sequence, a hilarious rewording of the National Anthem for our politically correct times, and plenty more pratfalls and high jinks.

As the A&E editor of bocamag.com, I offer reviews, previews, interviews, news reports and musings on all things arty and entertainment-y in Palm Beach, Broward and Miami-Dade counties.